WePark- parking space into an outdoor office

WePark- parking space into an outdoor office

WePark is a novel initiation of rethinking of parking space. It first began in San Francisco and is now taking the lead in radical usage of space. Started by Victor Pontis, when he set up his office in a parking space near City Hall in San Fransico, Pontis became the organizer of We Park.

Pontis’ stunt at the City Hall became popular among daily commuters and a crowd of cyclists, walkers and riders stopped by during Pontis’ four hours and paid the parking meter around $1.50 an hour. This lifted the reputation of the parking space near City Hall, and it became known as a place for productive co-working and socializing. With the city of San Francisco offering provision of free public Wireless internet, it became an added bonus to the setup. Pontis said in a statement about WePark, “You can use this space even if it’s just asphalt under the sun. You just need a desk and some friends.”

Several people followed Pontis’ example. A couple of folding chairs and portable tables fulfilled their requirements for a temporary outdoor office. People would sit outdoors, and go through their documents about a meeting before heading back to their indoor offices. The outdoor office stunt went viral and took to social media instantly with public turning parking spots into temporary office space in Los Angeles, Portland, Bristol and Oregon. Pontis’ idea behind the start-up is to help gather like-minded people and chat about their job-search struggles. WePark also created safer spaces for the public, nobody felt the need to lock up their bikes or even the customers left their bags with other people, Pontis said in a statement.

WePark is similar to another such San Francisco enterprise- Parklets. It began in 2005, with the similar idea of transforming parking spaces into portable, green and socaible parking spots. The idea of WePark has gone global. With the internet swarmed by pictures of people in their outdoor work space, WePark groups have also coalesced abroad, with organizers in Bristol, Los Angeles and Portland, Oregon planning to claim public parking spots in the weeks ahead.